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Dedication of A Sword

Materials Needed:

  • Sword (doesn’t matter if sword is just for decor)
  • candles (1 for each element +1 black candle)
  • incense (preferably a dark colored incense any flavor)
  • strip of leather (length of sword)
  • bowl full of water (cauldron works)

Begin by cleansing your materials. Give any opening offerings to the Gods of your choice (preferably war Gods). Plot the land where you will work (mandatory outdoor ritual). Light the black candle and keep it burning throughout the ritual. Cast a circle using the sword by drawing the circle around you. Put sword in center of circle. Light the candle that represents Water and say:

In the element of Water I bless this sword to my name  (your name here) .

Stretch out the leather and lay it across the sword. Let a few drops of the candle wax drop on the leather. Extinguish the candle. Light the candle for Earth and say:

In the name of the God (God’s name here) I bless this sword of the Earth.

Let some wax drip on the leather. Extinguish the candle. Light the candle for Air and the incense and say:

House Blessings

Collected by HalfWolfie; she who throws away nothing.

Seven Celtic blessings for your home. They are in original form, so adapt them as you see fit – like replacing Goddess for God or your favorite diety.

Blessing for a New Home

A blessing upon your new home,
A blessing upon your new hearth,
A blessing upon your new dwelling,
Upon your newly kindled fire.
A blessing upon your tallest grass,
A blessing upon your fruitful partner,
A blessing upon your growing son/s,
Upon your growing daughter/s.
A blessing upon the household’s helpers,
A blessing upon children yet unborn,
A blessing upon the wise parents,
Upon your occupation.
A blessing upon your goods and income,
A blessing upon your kith and kin,
A blessing upon you in light or darkness,
Each day and night of your lives.
- Carmina Gadelica

Blessing of the Three

The sacred three,
My fortress be,
Encircling me,
Come and be round,
My hearth, my home.
Fend Thou my kin,
And every sleeping thing within,
From scathe, from sin,
Thy care our peace,
Though mid of night,
To light’s release.
- MacLean, The Little Book of Celtic Blessings, trans. C. Matthews

Books for Neo-Pagan Children

(Note from Daven:  I have no idea where this particular list came from, but I remember how hard it was for me to find good books for our daughter to listen to.  To preserve the integrity of this document, I will not list my book selection here, but rather in the Bibliography section.  I hope this helps someone.)

Books for Neo-Pagan Children

These are just a few suggestions of books I think would be appropriate for Neo-Pagan kids. They reflect a reverence for nature, encourage environmental exploration, discuss myths and legends, and/or encourage creativity and fantasy.

The Stranger by Chris Van Allsburg, Houghton Mifflin, 1986. Farmer Bailey takes in a mysterious stranger who has amnesia and Autumn doesn’t seem to come. One day the stranger blows on a leaf and it turns bright red.

Whisper From the Woods by Victoria Worth, Green Tiger Press, 1991.In the dark forest a seedling grows among its siblings. In winter their roots hold hands underground, in summer they murmur together. A heavy storm blows their mother tree over, they cover her with leaves, seed falls, and the cycle begins again.

RITUALS OF MOTHERHOOD

By Andrea E. Feeser

*Note: This file may be distributed freely, so long as it remains intact and credit is given to the author.

*The Full Moon of the Mother ritual is pending publishing in Circle Network News, as of 1994.

*(C) Copyright 1995 Andrea E. Feeser

*Comments welcome: revblue@aol.com

DIVINATIONS FOR THE CHILD

If you wish to do a divination for the child, it is best if you already feel mentally and spiritually connected to him/her.

Prepare as you usually do for divination, laying out the tools you will use. Now, relax and center. Open your mind to that connection. You should feel an opening of the Third Eye charka. Visualize a stream of light connecting your Third Eye with your awareness of the child in the center of your body.

When you feel you have made this connection, proceed with your divination while maintaining this altered mental state.

BIRTHING SACHET

Here is a birthing sachet I devised. It should be held during meditations of peaceful childbirth. You should also have it with you during the actual childbirth, so that the associations with a peaceful and easy childbirth are awakened in your sub-conscious.

STORIES from Ireland, Scotland, and Wales

(Note from Daven:  This document, which had no accompanying explanation, seems mainly to deal with Celtic Mythology.  And it’s not the original texts either, but “modernized” stories, designed to grab your attention.  I only include them here for those of you who wish to persue just the basic mythology of the Celts.  For more scholarly works, I recommend the “Bibliography” on the navigation applet to the right.)

STORIES from Ireland, Scotland, and Wales

The Stone of Victory, and Other Tales. By Padraic Colum (McGraw). The great Irish storyteller’s choice of his favorites from his many stories. Illustrated by Judith Gwyn Brown.

Celtic Folk and Fairy Tales Edited by Joseph Jacobs (Putnam). These retellings are faithful to the spirit of Celtic stories.

Heather and Broom. Thistle and Thyme. Sea-Spell and Moor-Magic. Western Isles. By Loch and by Lin. Twelve Black Cats and Other Eerie Scottish Tales. By Sorche Nic Leodhas (Holt). Flavorful stories from Scottish folklore delightfully retold.

Donegal Fairy Stories. Collected and told by Seumas MacManus (Dover). Humorous and carefree Irish folktales skillfully retold by a master storyteller. With illustrations by Frank Verbeck.

The Seeker’s Bill of Rights

(Note from Daven:  I was a member of the Texas Pagan Community when this document began circulating around that community.  I know (from rumors mostly) some of what went on to prompt this document, but not enough to make any sweeping statements as to what happened.  I have had one person step up and claim credit for being the author of this document, and I humbly thank him for writing this.)

The Seeker’s Bill of Rights

High Priest Charles Mars

Seekers of the Pagan path are in an extremely vulnerable position. In their quest for teaching and fellowship, thy risk encountering those who use our faith to prey on others. Since paganism is still struggling for public acceptance, there is little sympathy from authorities. Neither can the elders of our community effectively address this issue. The most they can do is denounce these predators, and are usually accused of starting a “Witch War” when they do.

The answer to this dilemma is to empower those most vulnerable, the seekers. To this end, a Seeker’s Bill of Rights has been drafted. This tool will help to alert Seekers of a problem if a group or teacher violates any of the ten rights described. It will also serve to remind Seekers that while they do not have “degrees”, they are still human beings with rights and dignity.

Perfect Love and Perfect Trust

Note from Daven: This is another article from Sunfell.  When I asked for permission to reprint her other article, she graciously gave me permission to reprint this one as well.  It first appeared on The Witches Voice back in 2000.  I hope you like it.)

Perfect Love and Perfect Trust

Author: Sunfell http://www.sunfell.com/

When I was a wide-eyed newbie Pagan, all those incredible years ago, one of the first tenets of the Wiccan path I learned about was the one about “Perfect Love and Perfect Trust”. This, it was explained to me, was a way that was superior to those guilt-ridden old Christians, who professed to love, but did not, and could not be trusted to even correctly interpret Scripture. PLPT was a ‘superior’ and advanced way of interacting, and I needed to get used to it. This explanation was usually given to me by an older guy, and accompanied by a gradual insinuation of hands and eyes. I was supposed to melt right into this, and be introduced to the Mysteries of the Gods.

CREATING RITUALS: SACRED ACTS IN SACRED SPACE

<– Continued from

STATING PURPOSE:

State your purpose. Have a clear, short speech ready for this. A purpose that is complex is rather like a complex wish made to a genie–you don’t know what you’ll get. So you want to make sure your purpose is simple and direct. State it aloud, and give it your entire concentration–this is what you *WANT*. It should be the only thing on your mind at that moment.

The statement of purpose is followed by the body of the ritual. This will vary wildly depending on the ritual. Perhaps you will do candle magic, or perhaps you will meditate, perhaps you will enact a “spell” where you burn something, perhaps you will sit and travel out of your body in search of advise from a spirit guide. You may take a bath, wander on a quest through your back yard, look through an old photo album, or sing songs. The possibilities are limited only by your imagination.

We will go into possibilities for the body of a ritual, in detail, later on.

CLOSING:

TEMPLES, COVENS AND GROVES OH MY!

© 1992, Khaled Quicksilver
c/o P.O. Box 32, Stn “B”
Ottawa, Ontario K1P 6C3

[This article may be reprinted without further permission, provided it is printed intact, complete with this notice and my copyright, and a copy of the publication it appears in is sent to the author at the address given above. Any changes in the text, however, must be approved in advance by the author.]

There appears to be a fair amount of ongoing confusion as to what each of these is and what each of them should be doing, so let me stick my oar into it, too. But first, let’s play the definition game.

Circle: Three or more people who gather to work ritual or Craft. Some are ritual only, some worship only, but most do both. The following are all special cases of a Circle:

Grove: Circle usually led by, and under the auspices of, a coven. Frequently eclectic in practice, groves are commonly used as an introduction to the Craft as a whole but not necessarily to any given Tradition. Groves usually don’t initiate. May also be called a Study Group.

The Duille – Elements of the Druids

(Note from Daven:  When I first found this document, I wanted to reprint it, but despite multiple communications to the author, none of them were ever responded to, despite the fact that he was receiving them.  I know this because he responded to me once.  Be that as it may, I put this here.  One year of waiting is enough, and this article needs to be seen by more than just me.

This system of elements, while not what the Wiccans practice, is an interesting one.  I started using it, and also the three elements, Sky, Land, and Sea, and found the energies were extremely different.  The flavors were changed, and in a much more subtitle way, the entire lattice of magick was changed.  It was not bad, or negative, just changed.  Kind of like chewing nothing but Wrigley’s Spearmint gum for all your life, and then being given a piece of Juicy Fruit gum.  It takes a little while to readjust your expectations.)

The Duille ~ Elements of the Druids

By Kenneth R.White