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Dedication of A Sword

Materials Needed:

  • Sword (doesn’t matter if sword is just for decor)
  • candles (1 for each element +1 black candle)
  • incense (preferably a dark colored incense any flavor)
  • strip of leather (length of sword)
  • bowl full of water (cauldron works)

Begin by cleansing your materials. Give any opening offerings to the Gods of your choice (preferably war Gods). Plot the land where you will work (mandatory outdoor ritual). Light the black candle and keep it burning throughout the ritual. Cast a circle using the sword by drawing the circle around you. Put sword in center of circle. Light the candle that represents Water and say:

In the element of Water I bless this sword to my name  (your name here) .

Stretch out the leather and lay it across the sword. Let a few drops of the candle wax drop on the leather. Extinguish the candle. Light the candle for Earth and say:

In the name of the God (God’s name here) I bless this sword of the Earth.

Let some wax drip on the leather. Extinguish the candle. Light the candle for Air and the incense and say:

Privilege, Not Persecution

Note from Daven:I was directed toward this essay on Livejournal by a friend. I read it and thought it was one of the best of its type on the Internet. I didn’t want the essay to be lost because it was on an obscure blog, so I asked for permission to repost it here. Please read this and comment on the original article if you chose too.

By [personal profile] ebonypearl

On a friend’s FB, she commented about how she was tired of Christians whining about being persecuted in the US. She’s a sweet heart of a woman, charming, funny, warm-hearted, everything you’d want in a friend. She’s always a very devout Christian. I don’t think we’ve ever really discussed religion – there’s not a whole lot of need to talk if one walks the walk; there are so many other things to talk about when we get together. But over the years, we’ve come to learn things about one another and the fact that we have different religious beliefs only deepens our friendship.

Her wall post attracted a Christian who very plainly felt she was personally put upon and persecuted by American society for being Christian. When this woman (I’m calling her CP for “Christian Person”) commented that she viewed verbal comments from people expressing different points of view (mind you, not comments that attacked her religion, just expressed a different viewpoint) to be persecution, I’m sorry, but I rolled my eyes. When someone asked her for examples, CP wrapped herself in her privilege and accused the querant of attacking her and not caring; that :::sob::: nobody cared! so she just would go away and not talk to such mean people!

Shades of the old Fascist Meanie Pooh Pooh Head days!

Originally posted 2010-09-14 10:54:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

They Came for Me

“They came for the communists, and I did not speak up because I wasn’t a communist;

They came for the socialists, and I did not speak up because I was not a socialist;

They came for the union leaders, and I did not speak up because I wasn’t a union leader;

They came for the Jews, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Jew.

Then they came for me, and there was no one left to speak up for me.”

Martin Niemoller, 1892-1984

Originally posted 2009-11-10 02:34:25. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

An Annotated Bibliography for Witchcraft

The Magic of Ancient Celtic Beliefs in a Contemporary Society

(Note from Daven: I have personally read most of these texts and references.  I find them to be some of the best sources of information.  I highly recommend all these books, and I will append a list of my own personal favorites to the end of this article. Or at least, put the rest of the “recommended reading lists” there.)

The purpose of this listing is to help the novice sort out the reliable from the sensational in the wealth of material that is now available on Witchcraft. I have left out old historical treatises (records of the Inquisition and such) which are of little value to the modern student, and have concentrated instead on contemporary sources. This also yields a much more objective perspective. ~~ Mike Nichols [c.1989]

THE TEXTS

‘Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers, and Other Pagans in America Today’ – 2nd ed. – by Margot Adler. Beacon Press trade paperback.

BRIGIT OF THE CELTS

(Note from Daven:  I found this document when I was researching for Imbolic ceremonies for a Historical group I am involved with (Ancient Sites, if you must know) and I liked this so much, I copied it to my local computer.  Glad I did now.)

BRIGIT OF THE CELTS

Brigit was one of the great Triple Goddesses of the Celtic people. She appeared as Brigit to the Irish, Brigantia in Northern England, Bride in Scotland, and Brigandu in Brittany.

Many legends are told about Brigit. Some say that there are three Brigits : one sister in charge of poetry and inspiration who invented the Ogham alphabet, one in charge of healing and midwifery, and the third in charge of the hearth fire, smithies and other crafts. This catually indicates the separate aspects of her Threefold nature and is a neat division of labor for a hard-working goddess.

An Open Letter to Young Seekers

An Open Letter to Young Seekers

Merry Meet!

If you are under 18, you will probably already have noticed that young folks generally elicit different reactions from adults in the Pagan community than what you’d like. You’ve probably had a great deal of difficulty finding someone to answer your questions honestly, or a respected teacher who is willing or able to teach you what you really want to know.

Following is part of the general information we make available for young seekers. If you have any questions, we will do our best to answer what we can, but please understand if sometimes the answer is “you really need to ask your parents.” (If your parents support your interest and would like more information about Wicca, please have them contact us. Or bring them to a Laughing Cat meeting, where they can ask questions and meet members of the local Pagan community.)

We hope you can understand that without knowing your parents, and hearing directly from them that they support your interest in Wicca, an ethical teacher or mentor cannot work with you. Most groups and private teachers don’t accept seekers under 16 or 18. (Some even require you to be 21 — or even older!)

Guided Meditation for Brigid

©A L Folberth 1996     HalfWolfie@AOL.com

Permission granted for personal use only.

This is a guided meditation I wrote and led for Imbolc. It is designed for a group. A single candle is placed in front of the reader so it may be read in the dark.


This is a guided meditation. It is also called path working. It is a spiritual journey created by imagination. In a relaxed state, we can touch a side of ourselves that we may ignore in ordinary life.

We begin the meditation with relaxing. Stretch and move around until you are comfortable. This meditation will last no more than 15 minutes, Don’t worry about shifting position once we start. It’s your body’s way of telling you that the circulation is slowing down. If you are uncomfortable, you can’t concentrate. At the end of this meditation, I will ring a bell to let you know that it is over.

(Speak slowly and pause often)

Why Wicca Is Not Celtic v.3.0

(Daven’s Comments: Please note this carefully; this is NOT my essay. It is one of the classics of NeoPagan Literature, and as such deserves to be out there in the community. Every time, however, I find a copy of it, it somehow disappears off the Internet completely. To prevent this from being lost, I am putting it up here. So I don’t have to be anxious about whether or not it will vanish the next time I need to reference it. If you wish to see a more up to date version, please go to THIS SITE and read. I honestly don’t know the difference between these two, but that one is a higher version number. Sad to say the original site Clannada na Gadelica seems to have disappeared off the Internet completely. I leave this link here out of respect.)

by Iain MacAnTsaoir and Dawn O’Laoghaire


The following is by no means an indictment of the religion called Wicca. Wicca is indeed a valid and powerful path for those who truthfully walk it and understand it. However, there is a body of people who believe that Wicca is the descendant of the religious ways of the Gaelic or other Celtic peoples (or ‘Celts’ as a general nomenclature). This simply is not the case.

The Native American Ten Commandments

(Note from Daven:  I found this on another newsgroup, and it sparked a deep interest in me.  I could wish more people lived this way.  It would make for a better world.)

The Native American Ten Commandments

The Indian Ten Commandments (“Indian” meaning the indigenous people of the continent known now as North America. Commandments meaning traditional guidelines for harmonious social interchange.)

  1. Treat the earth and all that dwells thereon with respect.
  2. Remain close to the Great Spirit.
  3. Show great respect for your fellow beings.
  4. Work together for the benefit of all mankind.
  5. Give assistance and kindness wherever needed.
  6. Do what you know to be right.
  7. Look after well being of mind and body.
  8. Dedicate a share of your efforts to the greater good.
  9. Be truthful and honest at all times.
  10. Take full responsibility for all your actions

Originally posted 2009-11-14 22:25:02. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The (Outdated) Laws

(Note from Daven:  Okay, I include this document here because I have seen those who try to obey these “laws” and who have wound up more confused than peaceful.  Wicca is about removing restrictions, not imposing more.  At one point on one of the newsgroups that I was a member of, the discussion was raging on this document.  I read it, and responded point-by-point to that which I disagreed with.  My comments to this are indented and in red. I hope you all read this carefully and think on the points raised.)

The Laws from Lady Sheba

Your High Priestess In the Magic Circle, the words, commands, and every wish of the High Priestess are law.

She is the earthly, living representative of our Gracious Goddess. She must be obeyed and respected in all things. She is Our Lady and above all others, a queen in the highest sense of the word.

All female coveners must curtsy whenever they come before her and say, “Blessed Be.” All male coveners must bend the knee and give her a kiss on the right cheek and say, “Blessed Be.”